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Metallographic Analysis: See into a Metallic Heart

posted Tuesday 12 November 2013

Whether you are a company or a private citizen, if who would like to know what’s inside a particular kind of metal—especially one that is used often or that comes in contact with delicate surfaces—your best option is to contact a laboratory of metallographic analysis. The metallographic analysis is a vital process to make sure you’re using a top-quality metal. 



This kind of test will give you accurate information on the metal’s structure, composition, and physical, chemical, and technological properties. This load of information will allow you to make sure there are no flaws of refuses inside the metal. A thorough metallographic analysis is the result of the use of two kinds of microscopes—optical microscope and electronic microscope. The optical microscope allows to zoom in to the metal’s surface up to 450 times its actual size and lets us see right inside the very core of the metal. 

The first step to perform a metallographic analysis is to polish the metal to perfection. The standard size for the metal sample is of a few centimeters’ length. However, be careful when cutting off the sample from the main structure: it might happen that the metal will overheat due to attrition and lose part of its properties. In order to avoid such an inconvenience, make sure you’re using a piece of metal that is already of the proper size; alternatively, attempt cutting with the aid of a cooling substance. As far as polishing is concerned, the surface is honed with a horizontal belt sander so that the metal will be made perfectly smooth. 

After polishing, the metallographic analysis begins. This kind of analysis will also tell us about the quality of the metal we are examining. A drop of chemical reagent is poured on the surface—this can be either nital, hydrochloric acid, or glycerinated turpentine—so that its composition and purity level may be examined. In order to examine the crystal structure of the metal, an anode-cathode solution will allow us to examine the core of the metal.

After polishing, the metallographic analysis begins. This kind of analysis will also tell us about the quality of the metal we are examining. A drop of chemical reagent is poured on the surface—this can be either nitalhydrochloric acid, or glycerinated turpentine—so that its composition and purity level may be examined. In order to examine the crystal structure of the metal, an anode-cathode solution will allow us to examine the core of the metal.

 
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NOVEMBER 2013 NOVEMBER 2013 - (1 posts)